Category Archives: New York theater

Mad Cow announces a new play, shifts its schedule

Freud’s Last Session, a current off-Broadway hit, will fill the remaining to-be-announced slot in Mad Cow Theatre’s current season. The show, by playwright Mark St. Germain (Camping With Henry and Tom) will be presented March 11-April 3 in Mad Cow’s smaller theater, Stage Right.

The play tells the story of a meeting between Sigmund Freud and the much younger academic C.S. Lewis, who expects to be scolded for making fun of Freud in a recent book but finds out that the famous psychoanalyst has a more significant reason for wanting to meet.

St. Germain’s play had its premiere in Massachusetts in 2009 and opened off-Broadway last summer. Despite having to close in December because its theater was booked for another play, Freud’s Last Session proved to be so popular with audiences that the play reopened in January.

Because of scheduling for Freud’s Last Session, Mad Cow is juggling some of the remainder of its season. Here’s the new schedule:

  • Freud’s Last Session, March 11-April 3, Stage Right.
  • Circle Mirror Transformation, March 18-April 17, Stage Left (dates have shifted).
  • A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, June 10-July 10, Stage Left (dates remain the same).
  • Rashomon, June 17-July 10, Stage Right (dates have shifted).
  • Legacy of Light, July 29-Aug. 28, Stage Left (dates remain the same).
  • The Understudy, Aug. 5-28, Stage Right (dates remain the same).

Details: 407-297-8788 Ext. 1 or madcowtheatre.com.

Theater folks coming to speak at Rollins

There’s a string of theater people at work at Rollins in the next few months, and an actual bevy of them here in the next couple of weeks. All of them will be interacting with students and with the public — and my experience has been with Rollins visitors in the past has been that if you possibly can make it to hear these people, you should. All of the public events are free.

Let’s start with this weekend and move onward:

Playwright Arlene Hutton at Rollins

Playwright Arlene Hutton, whose play Letters to Sala will be presented Feb. 11-19 at Annie Russell Theatre, is at Rollins this week in preparation for that production.

She’ll talk about her play, and about the process of adapting a work from the page to the stage,  at 7 p.m. Wednesday night at Annie Russell Theatre. Hutton is here as part of a series sponsored by the Winter Park Institute, which will look at women in the Holocaust.

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Theater technicians needed in NYC

James Cleveland, a former production manager at Orlando Rep, is looking for technicians to work for a growing theater-production company, La Vie Productions, in New York. If someone you know is looking for a tech job there, please pass this info along from James:

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Why we need buskers in Orlando:

This video is from Union Square in New York:

Sondheim talks (and talks, and talks …)

Stephen Sondheim, now 80 and in a ruminative mood, is pushing a new book called Finishing the Hat, in which he writes about his lyrics, and others’.

Yesterday he spoke with Terry Gross on NPR‘s Fresh Air about the book. You can read about the interview here and listen here.

Tony-winner Karen Olivo to perform in Winter Haven

Karen Olivo, a Tony Award winner for her role as Anita in the current Broadway revival of West Side Story, will return to her old stomping grounds in November with an appearance at Theatre Winter Haven, where she was active as a teenager.

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Tony Kushner coming to Rollins

A big deal for the theater community: Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tony Kushner, whose masterpiece Angels in America is being revived this coming season in New York, will be at Rollins next spring as a guest of the Winter Park Institute.

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Pianos hit the streets

Do you all know about this public-art project in NYC?

Marian Seldes, and why she rocks

Those of you who watched the Tonys last night saw Marian Seldes, one of the last grande dames of the American theater, who deserves every grande adjective she gets.

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Theater review: ‘The Cradle Will Rock’

By Elizabeth Maupin

The opening night of The Cradle Will Rock, in 1937, was one theatrical event that has gone down in history – and deservedly so.

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Eatonville’s Norm Lewis to be featured on Sondheim recording

Norm Lewis, who grew up in Eatonville and graduated from Edgewater High School, will be among those on the Broadway cast recording of Sondheim on Sondheim, which will be recorded this weekend and released in August.

Along with Lewis, the cast features Barbara Cook, Vanessa Williams and Tom Wopat, plus Leslie Kritzer, Euan Morton, Erin Mackey and Matthew Scott. Among the songs is Lewis’s rendition of the Sondheim classic “Being Alive.”

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Here’s Brian

Brian Feldman at MOMA right now:

http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/marinaabramovic/index.html

Brian Feldman stares at an artist

Performance artist Marina Abramovic is in the last day of a 2-1/2-month exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, one part of which consists of her sitting in a chair and staring at whoever is sitting in a chair opposite her.

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Sean Hayes to host Tonys

This was announced yesterday, but with so much Fringe stuff to do I wasn’t able to pass it on. Sean Hayes, of Promises, Promises and Will & Grace, will host this year’s Tonys June 13.

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Postcard from Broadway: ‘Million Dollar Quartet’

Thinking about the Tony nominations for best book of a musical, after I’ve been seeing Broadway shows all week, is what you might call a mind-blowing experience. Night after night we’ve seen musicals in which the story-telling is completely inept. Sometimes it seems as if there’s no book at all.

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Postcard from Broadway: ‘La Cage aux Folles’

If you’re a fan of La Cage aux Folles, as I am, you shouldn’t worry that its latest Broadway revival has gone all dark on us. Director Terry Johnson and London’s Menier Chocolate Factory, where this production originated, haven’t given La Cage the Cabaret treatment – strung-out and seedy – and they haven’t treated Jerry Herman’s and Harvey Fierstein’s huge-hearted musical as if it were a stripped-down John Doyle production of Company or Sweeney Todd.

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Postcard from Broadway: ‘Fela!’

The first act of Fela!, about the late Nigerian musician Fela Anikulapo-Kuti, is a dance concert with political pretensions – a celebration of Kuti’s Afrobeat sound without any clear articulation of who he really was or why you should care.

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Postcard from Broadway: ‘Come Fly Away’

Maybe Twyla Tharp’s gifts seem made for the American songbook. She brought together a bunch of Billy Joel songs and turned them into Movin’ Out, a dance show with plot, drive and exhilaration. Earlier in her career, in the 1970s and ‘80s, she choreographed to the songs of Frank Sinatra, and such pieces as “Nine Sinatra Songs” and “Sinatra Suite” have become dance-company staples.

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Postcard from Broadway: ‘A Little Night Music’

Star vehicles can be a mixed bag on Broadway: It’s thrilling to see the people many of us dream about, but it can be disappointing too. There’s a little of both sides in the newest revival of A Little Night Music, which stars Catherine Zeta-Jones and the 84-year-old Angela Lansbury in the musical that is probably Stephen Sondheim’s most sumptuous work.

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